Dedicated to the one and only Mr. Tom Hardy, a daily source of inspiration!... :)

18th April 2014

Video reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 77 notes

tomhardyvariations:

Here’s the full Locke UK premiere Q&A with Tom Hardy and Steven Knight. Yay! With many thanks to UKFilmNews.

Tom: “I’m a big greedy for life.”

Source: youtube.com

17th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Sexually Frustrated Palm Cult with 80 notes

tomhardyvariations:

From Moving Image Creations on Facebook. Photo evidence that Tom really loved the Lego cement mixer: he deniro’d it. :D

[Tom] was gobsmacked when Mail Film Editor Graham Young caught up with him – and presented him with a Lego cement mixer set!

“That’s absolutely awesome,” said Hardy, clutching the present. “I’m touched. I’ll share it with my son Louis, who was six at the weekend.” (x)

Source: birminghammail.co.uk

17th April 2014

Video reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 31 notes

charlidos:

An interview on the red carpet for Locke - part 2,

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 117 notes

charlidos:

Interview with Tom from Wales online:

Tom Hardy says he based the Welsh accent in his new film on a “hotch-potch” of Richard Burton’s reading of Under Milk Wood and an ex-SAS soldier who’d protected him while touring war-torn Afghanistan.
In Locke, which opens in cinemas nationwide today, the 36-year-old Londoner plays Ivan Locke, a softly-spoken everyman who endures a dark night of the soul when a mistake from his past comes back to haunt him, throwing his well ordered existence into disarray.
And, despite the nationality of the character never being specified in the original script, the star admitted he knew straight away how he wanted to approach the role.
“Ivan just felt Welsh to me, to be honest,” says Hardy, who took time out from the film’s premiere in Birmingham last night to chat. “He’s this really down-to-earth guy who manages to exhibit a great deal of grace under pressure. So while all these crises are going on and people are losing their heads around him, he somehow manages to keep it together. As a result, I figured he needed to sound soothing and centred, so I listened a lot to Burton doing Dylan Thomas and attempted to emulate him. God, I wish I had a voice like Burton’s – but I don’t , sadly.”
Shot entirely within the confines of a BMW hurtling down a florescent-lit motorway to London, Hardy is the only actor seen on screen throughout the film’s 85 minute duration.
Its other players – such as Olivia Coleman and Sherlock’s Andrew Scott – materialise only as disembodied voices on the other end of Locke’s hands-free phone.
And, as his journey progresses, each new call that comes through only serves to heap on new problems, unearth personal skeletons and slowly form cracks in his steely composure.
“Outwardly he’s seems in control but there’s a lot going on behind the eyes,” says Hardy. “I was going for that same kind of stillness which Anthony Hopkins brings to many of his roles – I’m a massive fan of his too.”
The Batman actor – last seen playing the hulking, villainous Bane in The Dark Knight Rises – also admitted that he based much of Locke on an ex-SAS pal who chaperoned him when he went to Kabul to do research for an upcoming movie project about post-traumatic stress disorder in British troops returning from the Middle East.
“I went there with a chap called William Freear who runs a specialist risk management firm called Pilgrim’s Group –they look after the likes of CNN when they go reporting in global trouble hot spots like Libya,” says Hardy. “Bill’s a bloke who’s been to some pretty scary places in his lifetime and has been shot at a lot, and I was amazed at how calm and contained he was at all times. He’s a very tough guy, very intelligent and I just thought, ‘That’s Ivan, right there’. I wanted my character to be like a ship’s captain forced to weather this terrible storm – although, admittedly, one which is largely of his own making. Hence my decision to have a beard, chunky jumper and RNLI sticker on the car window, I suppose,” he laughs.
Rehearsed and filmed in less than two weeks, critics have so far fawned over Hardy’s work in the drama, describing as ‘a powerhouse performance’ and ‘extraordinary’.
The only sticking point? Hardy’s approximation of that rolling Valleys lilt which some have dubbed as a ‘cross between Ivor The Engine and Indian immigrant’.
“I have had a bit of ribbing about it, but that’s okay,” he said. “There’s always going to be banter – that’s just the nature of the beast. The Welsh accent is a really tricky one to get right and, while I admit mine may not be perfect, I did my best. I’m just really proud of this film and am really chuffed I was given the chance to play around with the character and do my own thing. It’s a low budget, experimental piece and we’re all over the moon with the amount of attention and praise it’s received. Fair play to everyone involved, it took a lot of balls to do.”

charlidos:

Interview with Tom from Wales online:

Tom Hardy says he based the Welsh accent in his new film on a “hotch-potch” of Richard Burton’s reading of Under Milk Wood and an ex-SAS soldier who’d protected him while touring war-torn Afghanistan.

In Locke, which opens in cinemas nationwide today, the 36-year-old Londoner plays Ivan Locke, a softly-spoken everyman who endures a dark night of the soul when a mistake from his past comes back to haunt him, throwing his well ordered existence into disarray.

And, despite the nationality of the character never being specified in the original script, the star admitted he knew straight away how he wanted to approach the role.

“Ivan just felt Welsh to me, to be honest,” says Hardy, who took time out from the film’s premiere in Birmingham last night to chat. “He’s this really down-to-earth guy who manages to exhibit a great deal of grace under pressure. So while all these crises are going on and people are losing their heads around him, he somehow manages to keep it together. As a result, I figured he needed to sound soothing and centred, so I listened a lot to Burton doing Dylan Thomas and attempted to emulate him. God, I wish I had a voice like Burton’s – but I don’t , sadly.”

Shot entirely within the confines of a BMW hurtling down a florescent-lit motorway to London, Hardy is the only actor seen on screen throughout the film’s 85 minute duration.

Its other players – such as Olivia Coleman and Sherlock’s Andrew Scott – materialise only as disembodied voices on the other end of Locke’s hands-free phone.

And, as his journey progresses, each new call that comes through only serves to heap on new problems, unearth personal skeletons and slowly form cracks in his steely composure.

“Outwardly he’s seems in control but there’s a lot going on behind the eyes,” says Hardy. “I was going for that same kind of stillness which Anthony Hopkins brings to many of his roles – I’m a massive fan of his too.”

The Batman actor – last seen playing the hulking, villainous Bane in The Dark Knight Rises – also admitted that he based much of Locke on an ex-SAS pal who chaperoned him when he went to Kabul to do research for an upcoming movie project about post-traumatic stress disorder in British troops returning from the Middle East.

“I went there with a chap called William Freear who runs a specialist risk management firm called Pilgrim’s Group –they look after the likes of CNN when they go reporting in global trouble hot spots like Libya,” says Hardy. “Bill’s a bloke who’s been to some pretty scary places in his lifetime and has been shot at a lot, and I was amazed at how calm and contained he was at all times. He’s a very tough guy, very intelligent and I just thought, ‘That’s Ivan, right there’. I wanted my character to be like a ship’s captain forced to weather this terrible storm – although, admittedly, one which is largely of his own making. Hence my decision to have a beard, chunky jumper and RNLI sticker on the car window, I suppose,” he laughs.

Rehearsed and filmed in less than two weeks, critics have so far fawned over Hardy’s work in the drama, describing as ‘a powerhouse performance’ and ‘extraordinary’.

The only sticking point? Hardy’s approximation of that rolling Valleys lilt which some have dubbed as a ‘cross between Ivor The Engine and Indian immigrant’.

“I have had a bit of ribbing about it, but that’s okay,” he said. “There’s always going to be banter – that’s just the nature of the beast. The Welsh accent is a really tricky one to get right and, while I admit mine may not be perfect, I did my best. I’m just really proud of this film and am really chuffed I was given the chance to play around with the character and do my own thing. It’s a low budget, experimental piece and we’re all over the moon with the amount of attention and praise it’s received. Fair play to everyone involved, it took a lot of balls to do.”

17th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 86 notes

charlidos:

The star spent more than an hour on the red carpet talking to fans, signing autographs and posing for pictures with the crowds. He arrived at 6.15pm and the film was due to start at 7pm but the actor was still talking to fans at 7.30pm.
- Tom Hardy is surely the most decent movie star ever. :D

17th April 2014

Video reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 102 notes

charlidos:

Tom Hardy & Steven Knight interviewed by ITV on the red carpet tonight. 

17th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 51 notes

charlidos:

Tom Hardy talks about Locke and Steven Knight talks about Tom’s part in Peaky Blinders in The Evening Standard:

"It was a bit of an experiment really - and it’s paid off, because it works," [Tom Hardy] said.

Hardy, who signed dozens of autographs and posed for selfies for fans at the premiere in Knight’s home town of Birmingham, said he had been blessed with “a great script” from which to work from.

"It’s almost like a radio-play on one hand, and then just running the camera as life goes by. It’s in real time," he said. "We shot the whole film in one. We did the play twice a night for five nights, and it took 10 days to do the bits and bobs and cut it all together - it was quite an experimental piece."

Also starring the voice talents of Ruth Wilson, Andrew Scott and Olivia Coleman, Hardy said the camaraderie on set had helped to deliver the film’s edge.

He added: “There’s always camaraderie when you’ve got a good team but it was a very bizarre set-up which is what was good fun about it. We’d got a script, we only had a couple of weeks to shoot it in and swam through fences to do it. It’s such a great script, such a great idea and it seems to have worked.”

Hardy was originally offered the part by Knight in what was originally a short film “about a bloke travelling to see his son being born”.

However, in the event the movie ended up as a full-length feature film. “It was a short film that turned into a feature film, I loved it,” he said.

——-

The second series [of Peaky Blinders], airing on British television screens in autumn and featuring Hardy in five of the six episodes, is “better than series one”, added Knight.

Giving little away, Knight said Hardy’s character was London-based and would prove to be “a friend, an ally, and an enemy” to the Shelby family, which features actor Cillian Murphy as head of the family, Tommy Shelby.

Knight approached Hardy after finishing Locke together. He said: “We had such a laugh doing Locke. There was a character I had already written and I asked him, would he be interested - it is a very different role to Ivan Locke - and he agreed to do it.”

16th April 2014

Video reblogged from It tastes like tree, mate with 50 notes

thas-fandom:

Locke - Uk Premiere (a fan video)@mrwhite___97 “FUCKKK YEAAA TROLLED @TOMHARDY AHAHAHHAHA #tomhardy #selfie #BANE #BRONSON #IMSOHAPPY #OMG #OMFG #mynigga #LOL #BIRMINGHAM #CINIEWORLD #PREMIERE #LOCKE #BOSS

Source: thas-fandom

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Exploring Tom Hardy with 110 notes

tomhardyvariations:

Interview with Steven Knight in Birmingham Mail...

(and confirmation that Tom’s going to attend the Locke premiere in New York. :))

Film writer Graham Young talks to Locke director Steven Knight

“Hello Steven… it’s Steven. Congratulations with your new movie!”

Birmingham filmmaker Steven Knight knew he had made a good job of the film that is closest to his heart when he took a phone call from Hollywood legend Steven Spielberg.

“When he calls, you answer the phone,” said the Birmingham-born Peaky Blinders’ creator.

“He just wanted me to know that he had watched it and really liked it.”

Steven revealed the story at Wednesday night’s glittering UK premiere of Locke (15), the story of one ordinary man’s personal nightmare during a motorway journey that begins in Birmingham.

Star Tom Hardy (The Dark Knight Rises) was the main red carpet attraction at Cineworld Broad Street, garnering lots of attention from women swooning over his macho appeal.

But none of it would have happened without the writer-director wanting to open the film in his home town.

“I asked Tom if he would do it and he said ‘Yes’,” said Steven.

“Which is good because I think he’s the best young actor we’ve got right now.” 

Hardy spends most of Locke strapped inside a BMW saloon – after Jaguar Land Rover declined to give Steven permission to use his favoured car of choice, a Land Rover.

“We could have got a Land Rover, of course, and I would have loved it to have been a Land Rover in the film,” said Steven.

“But they didn’t want to give us permission to use it.

Hardy’s appearance in Birmingham was extra special because he is only doing one other premiere for the film – and that will be in New York.

Steven Knight had flown in specially from Chicago to attend the Birmingham screening after also launching the film in Phoenix, San Francisco, Seattle and LA. After the New York premiere with Tom, Steven is then taking it to Boston, Washington, Dallas and Toronto.

But he said there’s nowhere better than home – Birmingham.

“It’s just great that we’ve been able to screen it here,” said Steven.

“I just thought ‘Why not?’.

“We need to do more things like this to help the city.

“The beginning of the film was shot from the top of a tower block near the Villa ground and it shows Spaghetti Junction and the M6.

“The landmark is very Birmingham, very functional – I remember being driven over it when it had opened and having it pointed out.

“I just wanted the film to make it look as beautiful as possible with soft focus on the lights.”

Source: birminghammail.co.uk

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Einstein took Science, We took Hardyness with 108 notes

tomhardyvariations:

Handsome and dapper gentlemen! Tom Hardy and Steven Knight at the Locke premiere in Birmingham.

From (clockwise top left): Image: Lucy ‘Oubs’ Osbaldeston) via Birmingham Updatesnuvoleintempesta

Source: twitter.com